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Monument 14: Savage Drift by Emmy Laybourne

January 27, 2017

Now at Quilchena Refugee Camp in Canada, Dean and the survivors from Monument 14 are safe. The only concern is that Josie is missing. She is now at a Type O containment camp in Missouri where everyone is going crazy due to the reaction from their blood type, and a mean guard called Vengar bosses everyone around. Niko finds out where she is from the start of the book and is determined to rescue her. Jake, Astrid (who is still pregnant), and Dean want to go with him. So a man at the refugee camp takes them to an airport in Idaho where their newest adventure begins.

Monument 14: Savage Drift is a great conclusion to the Monument 14 series. I appreciated how Laybourne switched between the perspectives of Josie and Dean, which were very different, especially at the beginning when Dean and his friends have all that they needed at Quilchena Refugee Camp, while Josie, at the Type O containment camp, is treated terribly. People there are constantly fighting, but a kind man named Mario looks after Josie and the other kids. I also enjoyed how Laybourne recorded the number of each day since the hailstorm at the bottom of each page. I could easily keep track of which day it was. I thought Laybourne described the setting well. I could picture it although I think that the first book had better imagery because the characters spent the whole novel in the store. However, I would change how much Dean, Jake, and Astrid argued. In the other books they seemed to get along better and worked as a team to protect the little kids.

Laybourne’s character development was also effective. Dean, at first, seemed to stand up for Astrid too much and argued with Jake often, but as the book went on, he learned that he was overly protective and became more of a leader, with a little help from Niko. Josie, on the other hand, was very helpful to Mario and in looking after the little kids. She also was good at standing up for herself when crazed Type Os were being cruel to her. As the book went on she kept trying to escape, never giving up.

Overall, I really liked this book. I enjoyed how It switched between Josie and Dean’s perspectives, and the settings were intriguing and easy to picture. I would rate it a nine out of ten and recommend it to anyone who likes exciting, survival books and great character development.

Forest

Square Fish Books, 308 pages


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