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Copper Sun by Sharon Draper

January 27, 2017

Amari’s life had once been perfect: engaged to the man of her dreams, blessed with an adorable little brother, and living in a beautiful African village. But one summer day in 1738, this changes forever. Amari is captured from her home and brought to South Carolina to be sold. On the treacherous voyage across the Atlantic, she meets an older woman, Afi, who encourages her and lets her know that everything will turn out right. After spending a year at the plantation Amari realizes that being a slave is not what she wants for her life. She makes many friends that treat her like family, but after a tragic event Amari chooses to escape with two of her friends: Polly, the indentured servant, and Tidbit, the cook’s son.

I enjoyed how Sharon Draper wrote this novel in third person; each chapter focused on a different character, either Polly or Amari. Draper also wrote from family history, knowing that made the plot more believable. Her diction was amazing throughout the book­–it felt like I was reading poetry because every sentence was so concise, which made it a quick read.

The only aspect that didn’t work for me was how the author developed Polly; Draper made her a very stuck up, self-centered character, who didn’t add to the book. This made me look forward to reading the Amari chapters more than the Polly chapters.

I loved that this book was written about a hard, unexplainable time in America’s history, but wasn’t completely focused on the horrors of slavery. If you’re over twelve and are interested this time period, you would love this book. Over all, this optimistic historical fiction novel is a must-read, so pull out that Someday List and write down Copper Sun by Sharon Draper.

Ella

302 pages, Simon Pulse

 


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