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Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

March 21, 2017

Etta started to pull herself up, not caring that she was crying, just looking for fresh air and a path out of this nightmare. Instead, she climbed into the mouth of another one.

Etta is an extraordinary violinist with a mysterious mother and a loving music teacher. Nicholas is a legal pirate and daring sailor, whose mother was a slave. They have one thing in common: they can time travel. Yes, they can visit any place, any time period, as long as there is a passage. Etta’s mother keeps this gift secret from her, until Sophia—another traveler—pushes her into a nearby passage, after shots ring out in the present. Etta wakes up several days later to find herself aboard an unfamiliar ship and that her clothes and beloved earrings are missing. For Nicholas, however, his gift is more of a curse. It placed him in indentured servitude working for a family he despises. It is not until he meets Etta, that he begin to question the hearts of his “family”, and what their ambitions truly are. Together they go on an impossible journey through time to recover (and hopefully destroy) an astrolabe with the capability to create passages—Although they know that Cyrus Ironwood, their grandfather, wants it for darker reasons.

Bracken crafts the narrative well: the perspectives switch back and forth between Etta and Nicholas, while remaining in the third person. For example, Bracken leaves cliffhangers, and then the narrative will cut to the other character and whatever he or she is doing in that chapter. I thought that this was effective because it kept the plot moving and the readers on their toes, making them want to continue. She also cues time transitions effectively so readers can easily tell where and when they are. For instance, when there is a new chapter, she tells readers what time period the characters are in and what the year is.

I loved how Bracken develops not only the protagonists but also the secondary characters and antagonists. For example, Sophia is well-developed so that the readers can feel pity for her but also hate her for being rude and annoying to both Etta and Nicholas. Readers can also picture her well: her long dark hair, black eyes, and milky complexion. I also liked how Cyrus Ironwood was portrayed and described, because he seems like a mysterious and creepy man. The way he talks and takes control of even the air around him is disturbing.

Bracken transported me to unimaginable times, and indescribable places. I hope you will join me as a Passenger on this time traveling journey, because this is a book beyond rating.

Emma

Disney-Hyperion, 486 pages


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